Is socioeconomic status in early life associated with drug use? A systematic review of the evidence.

@article{Daniel2009IsSS,
  title={Is socioeconomic status in early life associated with drug use? A systematic review of the evidence.},
  author={James Z Daniel and Matthew Hickman and John Macleod and Nicola Wiles and Anne Lingford-Hughes and M Farrell and Ricardo Araya and Petros Skapinakis and Jon Haynes and Glyn Lewis},
  journal={Drug and alcohol review},
  year={2009},
  volume={28 2},
  pages={
          142-53
        }
}
AIM To conduct a systematic review of longitudinal studies that examined the association between childhood socioeconomic status (SES) and illegal drug use in later life. [...] Key Method These included MEDLINE (1966-2005), EMBASE (1990-2005), CINAHL (1982-2005) and PsychInfo (1806-2005), and specialist databases of the Lindesmith Library, Drugscope and Addiction Abstracts. Foreign-language papers were included. Abstracts were screened independently by two reviewers.Expand
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Running head : Lifecourse socioeconomic position and substance use 1 Lifecourse socioeconomic position and tobacco and cannabis use
250 in se rm -0 07 08 18 9, v er si on 1 14 J un 2 01 2 Author manuscript, published in "European Journal of Public Health 2012;:epub ahead of print" DOI : 10.1093/eurpub/cks065 Running head:Expand
Associations of adolescent cannabis use with academic performance and mental health: A longitudinal study of upper middle class youth.
TLDR
Low SES cannot fully explain associations between cannabis use and poorer academic performance and mental health in high SES communities where there is reduced potential for confounding. Expand
Adolescent Alcohol and Tobacco Use and Early Socioeconomic Position: The ALSPAC Birth Cohort
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Alcohol drinking was more common in young people from higher-income households but less common with higher levels of maternal education, which may reflect how different aspects of socioeconomic position can influence health behavior in opposing directions. Expand
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