Is sex important? Gender differences in bipolar disorder

@article{Diflorio2010IsSI,
  title={Is sex important? Gender differences in bipolar disorder},
  author={Arianna Diflorio and I. Jones},
  journal={International Review of Psychiatry},
  year={2010},
  volume={22},
  pages={437 - 452}
}
Sex is clearly important in unipolar mood disorder with compelling evidence that depression is approximately twice as common in women than in men. In the case of bipolar disorder, however, it is widely perceived that the reported equal rate of illness in men and women reflects no important gender distinctions. In this paper we review the literature on gender differences in bipolar illness and attempt to summarize what is known and what requires further study. Despite the uncertainties that… Expand
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