Is salinity the main ecologic factor that shapes the distribution of two endemic Mediterranean plant species of the genus Gypsophila?

Abstract

Responses to salt stress of two Gypsophila species that share territory, but with different ecological optima and distribution ranges, were analysed. G. struthium is a regionally dominant Iberian endemic gypsophyte, whereas G. tomentosa is a narrow endemic reported as halophyte. The working hypothesis is that salt tolerance shapes the presence of these species in their specific habitats. Taking a multidisciplinary approach, we assessed the soil characteristics and vegetation structure at the sampling site, seed germination and seedling development, growth and flowering, synthesis of proline and cation accumulation under artificial conditions of increasing salt stress and effect of PEG on germination and seedling development. Soil salinity was low at the all sampling points where the two species grow, but moisture was higher in the area of G. tomentosa. Differences were found in the species’ salt and drought tolerance. The different parameters tested did not show a clear pattern indicating the main role of salt tolerance in plant distribution. G. tomentosa cannot be considered a true halophyte as previously reported because it is unable to complete its life cycle under salinity. The presence of G. tomentosa in habitats bordering salt marshes is a strategy to avoid plant competition and extreme water stress.

DOI: 10.1007/s11104-014-2218-2

Extracted Key Phrases

15 Figures and Tables

Cite this paper

@article{Soriano2014IsST, title={Is salinity the main ecologic factor that shapes the distribution of two endemic Mediterranean plant species of the genus Gypsophila?}, author={Pilar Soriano and F{\'e}lix Moruno and Monica Boşcaiu and Oscar Vicente and Amparo Hurtado and Josep V. Llinares and Elena Estrelles}, journal={Plant and Soil}, year={2014}, volume={384}, pages={363-379} }