Is physical activity in natural environments better for mental health than physical activity in other environments?

@article{Mitchell2013IsPA,
  title={Is physical activity in natural environments better for mental health than physical activity in other environments?},
  author={Richard J. Mitchell},
  journal={Social science & medicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={91},
  pages={
          130-4
        }
}
Experimental evidence suggests that there may be synergy between the psychological benefits of physical activity, and the restorative effects of contact with a natural environment; physical activity in a natural environment might produce greater mental health benefits than physical activity elsewhere. However, such experiments are typically short-term and, by definition, artificially control the participant types, physical activity and contact with nature. This observational study asked whether… CONTINUE READING

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