Is male plumage reflectance correlated with paternal care in bluethroats

@article{Smiseth2001IsMP,
  title={Is male plumage reflectance correlated with paternal care in bluethroats},
  author={Per T. Smiseth and Jonas {\"O}rnborg and Staffan Andersson and Trond Amundsen},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2001},
  volume={12},
  pages={164-170}
}
Although it is now well established that the conspicuous male plumage colors of many birds have been subject to sexual selection by female choice, it is still debated whether females mate with colorful males to obtain direct or indirect benefits. In species where males provide substantial parental care, females may obtain direct benefits from mating with the males that are best at providing care. The good parent hypothesis suggests that male plumage coloration signals a male’s ability to… 

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