Is light pollution driving moth population declines? A review of causal mechanisms across the life cycle

@article{Boyes2020IsLP,
  title={Is light pollution driving moth population declines? A review of causal mechanisms across the life cycle},
  author={Douglas H. Boyes and Darren M. Evans and Richard Fox and Mark S Parsons and Michael J. O. Pocock},
  journal={Insect Conservation and Diversity},
  year={2020},
  volume={14}
}
  • D. Boyes, D. Evans, M. Pocock
  • Published 13 September 2020
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Insect Conservation and Diversity
The night‐time environment is increasingly being lit, often by broad‐spectrum lighting, and there is growing evidence that artificial light at night (ALAN) has consequences for ecosystems, potentially contributing to declines in insect populations. Moths are species‐rich, sensitive to ALAN, and have undergone declines in Europe, making them the ideal group for investigating the impacts of light pollution on nocturnal insects more broadly. Here, we take a life cycle approach to review the… 
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