Is health care infected by Baumol's cost disease? Test of a new model

@article{Atanda2018IsHC,
  title={Is health care infected by Baumol's cost disease? Test of a new model},
  author={Akinwande Abdulmaliq Atanda and Andrea Kutinova Menclova and W. Robert Reed},
  journal={Health Economics},
  year={2018},
  volume={27},
  pages={832–849}
}
Rising health care costs are a policy concern across the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and relatively little consensus exists concerning their causes. One explanation that has received revived attention is Baumol's cost disease (BCD). However, developing a theoretically appropriate test of BCD has been a challenge. In this paper, we construct a 2-sector model firmly based on Baumol's axioms. We then derive several testable propositions. In particular, the model… 

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