Is family special to the brain? An event-related fMRI study of familiar, familial, and self-face recognition

@article{Platek2009IsFS,
  title={Is family special to the brain? An event-related fMRI study of familiar, familial, and self-face recognition},
  author={Steven M. Platek and Shelly M. Kemp},
  journal={Neuropsychologia},
  year={2009},
  volume={47},
  pages={849-858}
}
The face-processing network has evolved to respond differentially to different classes of faces depending on their relevance to the perceiver. For example, self-, familiar, and unknown faces are associated with activation in different neural substrates. Family should represent a special class of face stimuli that is of high relevance to individuals, because incorrect assignment of kinship can have dire consequences (e.g., incest, cuckoldry). Therefore evolution should have favored redundant… Expand
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