Is esophagoscopy necessary during panendoscopy?

@article{Clayburgh2017IsEN,
  title={Is esophagoscopy necessary during panendoscopy?},
  author={Daniel R. Clayburgh and Daniel S. Brickman},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2017},
  volume={127}
}
BACKGROUND Panendoscopy, or the evaluation of the upper aerodigestive tract with oral inspection, direct laryngoscopy, esophagoscopy, bronchoscopy, or some combination of these procedures, is a valuable tool in the evaluation of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Despite the many advances made in imaging technology in recent years, these modalities cannot replace the surgeon’s ability to carefully inspect the mucosa of the upper aerodigestive tract to determine the… 
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In reference to Is esophagoscopy necessary during panendoscopy?
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