Is combining or alternating antipyretic therapy more beneficial than monotherapy for febrile children?

@article{Nabulsi2009IsCO,
  title={Is combining or alternating antipyretic therapy more beneficial than monotherapy for febrile children?},
  author={Mona Nabulsi},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2009},
  volume={339}
}
  • M. Nabulsi
  • Published 1 October 2009
  • Medicine
  • BMJ : British Medical Journal
Although fever is a beneficial host response, it is an important cause of anxiety for parents and doctors. The quest for effective treatment has led to new combination regimens of antipyretic drugs for febrile children. These are popular among caregivers and healthcare providers,1 2 3 4 but they have been tested in clinical trials only recently.4 5 6 7 8 The new regimens consist of combinations of ibuprofen and paracetamol (acetaminophen) given at variable time schedules. The main concern about… 
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TLDR
The administration of medication to control fever is a common practice, including alternating antipyretics in children, and most caregivers consider fever some temperatures below those recommended, and pointed out non-response and medical advice as the main reasons for alternating antipYretics.
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  • Medicine
    BMJ : British Medical Journal
  • 2009
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Predictive factors of this practice among pediatricians are male sex, having relatively little experience, considering ibuprofen as the drug of choice and recommending the administration of new doses of antipyretic to control mild fever despite the lack of scientific evidence to justify the practice.
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TLDR
Despite the lack of scientific evidence to justify the practice, the use of alternating antipyretics is common in the treatment of febrile children and Predictive factors of this practice among pediatricians are male sex, having relatively little experience, considering ibuprofen as the drug of choice and recommending the administration of new doses of antipYretic to control mild fever.
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TLDR
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