Is Wildlife Going to the Dogs? Impacts of Feral and Free-Roaming Dogs on Wildlife Populations

@inproceedings{Young2011IsWG,
  title={Is Wildlife Going to the Dogs? Impacts of Feral and Free-Roaming Dogs on Wildlife Populations},
  author={Julie K. Young and K. Olson and R. Reading and S. Amgalanbaatar and J. Berger},
  year={2011}
}
In human-populated landscapes, dogs (Canis familiaris) are often the most abundant terrestrial carnivore. However, dogs can significantly disrupt or modify intact ecosystems well beyond the areas occupied by people. Few studies have directly quantified the environmental or economic effects of free-roaming and feral dogs. Here, we review wildlife-dog interactions and provide a case study that focuses on interactions documented from our research in Mongolia to underscore the need for studies… Expand
A review of the interactions between free-roaming domestic dogs and wildlife
Abstract Negative impacts from the presence of domestic animals pose particular issues for biodiversity conservation as they are intimately tied to the economic, social and political values of localExpand
Domestic dogs shape the landscape-scale distribution of a threatened forest ungulate
TLDR
The hypothesis that the distribution of dogs can significantly influence the space use of potential prey, and that both lethal and non-lethal mechanisms may underlie this interaction, is tested to bring into focus important mechanisms underlying the threats of domestic dogs to endangered prey. Expand
The impacts of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) on wildlife in two Brazilian hotspots and implications for conservation
The impacts of domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) on wildlife in two Brazilian hotspots and implications for conservation. Exotic species are major threats to biodiversity worldwide. Domestic dogsExpand
Domestic Dogs in Rural Communities around Protected Areas: Conservation Problem or Conflict Solution?
TLDR
Results indicate that dog interactions with wildlife are related to the role of the dog in the household and are directly influenced by their owners, which means it is important to develop strategies for managing dogs that balance conservation needs with the roles that dogs play in these rural households. Expand
The global impacts of domestic dogs on threatened vertebrates
Abstract Domestic dogs ( Canis familiaris ) have a near-global distribution. They range from being feral and free-ranging to owned and completely dependent on humans. All types of domestic dogs canExpand
Raining feral cats and dogs? Implications for the conservation of medium-sized wild mammals in an urban protected area
Mammals are one of the most negatively affected groups by urbanization, nevertheless, urban reserves can help their conservation. The study of wildlife within the reserves is important for theExpand
Environmental factors regulate occupancy of free-ranging dogs on a sub-Antarctic island, Chile
TLDR
Assessment of space use of free-ranging dogs on a sub-Antarctic island in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve, southern Chile revealed evidence for a reproducing feral dog population on Navarino Island that may be sustained by recruits from rural/village dogs, as identical sites were visited by both dog categories. Expand
Depredatory impact of free-roaming domestic dogs on Mediterranean deer in southern Spain: implications for human-wolf conflict
Abstract. Feral domestic dogs are efficient wild ungulate hunters in many parts of the world. This has not been confirmed in Mediterranean ecosystems. However, if feral dogs can predate upon wildExpand
The ecological impact of humans and dogs on wildlife in protected areas in eastern North America
Abstract The establishment of protected areas is a key strategy for preserving biodiversity. However, human use of protected areas can cause disturbance to wildlife, especially in areas that allowExpand
Going to the Dogs: Free-Ranging Domestic Dogs Threaten an Endangered Wild Canid through Competitive Interactions
Domestic dogs threaten wildlife globally, especially other canids. The spread of infectious disease from dogs threatens Ethiopian wolves, via interference and exploitation competition. DespiteExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 90 REFERENCES
The Effects of Dogs on Wildlife Communities
TLDR
The effects of dogs on wildlife communities are studied by comparing the activity levels of wildlife in areas that prohibited dogs with areas that allowed dogs, and the presence of dogs along recreational trails correlated with altered patterns of habitat utilization by several species. Expand
Do wild dogs exclude foxes? Evidence for competition from dietary and spatial overlaps
TLDR
Examination of dietary and spatial interactions between wild dogs and foxes in the Greater Blue Mountains region of NSW finds evidence for dietary competition and fine-scale exclusion, but no support for landscape-scaleclusion of foxes by wild dogs in the Blue Mountains. Expand
The impact of free-roaming dogs on gazelle kid/female ratio in a fragmented area
TLDR
Overall, kid/female ratio in the area is too low for population growth; a finding that is in agreement with drive counts indicating a consistent decline over the past four years, and free-roaming dogs appear to be a considerable threat to the gazelle population in the study area. Expand
Diet of free-ranging domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) in rural Zimbabwe: implications for wild scavengers on the periphery of wildlife reserves
TLDR
Dogs outcompete vultures on wildlife reserve boundaries owing to their high densities, nocturnal and diurnal activity, physical dominance and greater tolerance of human disturbance. Expand
Free-ranging domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) as predators and prey in rural Zimbabwe: threats of competition and disease to large wild carnivores
TLDR
With a dog population growth rate of 6.5% per annum, and the prevalence of canid diseases, the conservation threat posed by dogs is escalating on communal land–wildlife reserve boundaries in Zimbabwe. Expand
Dogs Canis familiaris as carnivores: their role and function in intraguild competition
Dogs Canis familiaris are the world's most common carnivore and are known to interact with wildlife as predators, prey, competitors, and disease reservoirs or vectors. 2. Despite these varied rolesExpand
Navajo use of mixed-breed dogs for management of predators.
Seventy-two Navajo ranchers were questioned about the role of mixed-breed dogs with their Rocks. Navajos call their dogs “sheep dogs” but, unlike sheep dogs used by other ranchers to assist inExpand
The movement, roaming behaviour and home range of free-roaming domestic dogs, Canis lupus familiaris, in coastal New South Wales
TLDR
Ten free-roaming domestic dogs from an Aboriginal community were radio-collared to determine the sizes of their home ranges and to observe their wandering behaviour, which was highly variable within the study group. Expand
Competition between domestic dogs and Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis) in the Bale Mountains National Park, Ethiopia.
The potential effects of the domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) on the Endangered Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis) through exploitative and interference competition were studied in the Web Valley ofExpand
Domestic dogs as an edge effect in the Brasília National Park, Brazil: interactions with native mammals
Edge effects are a well-known result of habitat fragmentation. However, little has been published on fragmentation, isolation and the intrusive influence from the surrounding matrix at the landscapeExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...