Is Synergy the Rule? A Review of Anesthetic Interactions Producing Hypnosis and Immobility

@article{Hendrickx2008IsST,
  title={Is Synergy the Rule? A Review of Anesthetic Interactions Producing Hypnosis and Immobility},
  author={Jan F. A. Hendrickx and Edmond I. Eger and James M. Sonner and Steven L. Shafer},
  journal={Anesthesia \& Analgesia},
  year={2008},
  volume={107},
  pages={494-506}
}
BACKGROUND: Drug interactions may reveal mechanisms of drug action: additive interactions suggest a common site of action, and synergistic interactions suggest different sites of action. We applied this reasoning in a review of published data on anesthetic drug interactions for the end-points of hypnosis and immobility. METHODS: We searched Medline for all manuscripts listing propofol, etomidate, methohexital, thiopental, midazolam, diazepam, ketamine, dexmedetomidine, clonidine, morphine… 

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