Is Skin Color a Marker for Racial Discrimination? Explaining the Skin Color–Hypertension Relationship

@article{Klonoff2000IsSC,
  title={Is Skin Color a Marker for Racial Discrimination? Explaining the Skin Color–Hypertension Relationship},
  author={Elizabeth A. Klonoff and Hope Landrine},
  journal={Journal of Behavioral Medicine},
  year={2000},
  volume={23},
  pages={329-338}
}
It is widely assumed that dark-skinned Blacks have higher rates of hypertension than their lighter-skinned cohorts because the former experience greater racial discrimination. However, there is no empirical evidence linking skin color to discrimination. This study tested the extent to which skin color is associated with differential exposure to discrimination for a sample of 300 Black adults. Results revealed that dark-skinned Blacks were 11 times more likely to experience frequent racial… CONTINUE READING

From This Paper

Figures, tables, and topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 49 extracted citations

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 18 references

The Schedule of Racist Events: A measure of racial discrimination and a study of its negative physical and mental health consequences

  • H. Landrine, E. A. Klonoff
  • J. Black Psychol
  • 1996
Highly Influential
5 Excerpts

Cross-validation of the Schedule of Racist Events

  • A KlonoffE., H. Landrine
  • J. Black Psychol
  • 1999

Racial discrimination and psychiatric symptoms among Blacks

  • E. A. Klonoff, H. Landrine, J. B. Ullman
  • Cult. Divers. Ethnic Minor. Psychol
  • 1999
1 Excerpt

The Color Complex: The Politics of Skin Color Among African Americans, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, New York

  • K. Russel, M. Wilson, R. Hall
  • 1992
2 Excerpts

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…