Is Physician Anesthesia Cost-Effective?

@article{Abenstein2004IsPA,
  title={Is Physician Anesthesia Cost-Effective?},
  author={John P. Abenstein and Kirsten Hall Long and Brian P. McGlinch and Niki M. Dietz},
  journal={Anesthesia \& Analgesia},
  year={2004},
  volume={98},
  pages={750-757}
}
One of the most controversial issues in anesthesia is whether nonmedically directed nurse anesthetists are relatively more cost-effective than anesthesiologists in the provision of anesthesia care. We electronically surveyed anesthesia practices throughout the United States to estimate the range in anesthesia professional costs from the payer perspective. Using this survey data on anesthesia reimbursement and published outcomes studies, we developed an ad hoc model to estimate the cost… Expand
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