Is Obesity Stigmatizing? Body Weight, Perceived Discrimination, and Psychological Well-Being in the United States∗

@article{Carr2005IsOS,
  title={Is Obesity Stigmatizing? Body Weight, Perceived Discrimination, and Psychological Well-Being in the United States∗},
  author={Deborah Carr and M. Alexandra Friedman},
  journal={Journal of Health and Social Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={46},
  pages={244 - 259}
}
  • D. Carr, M. Friedman
  • Published 2005
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Journal of Health and Social Behavior
We investigate the frequency and psychological correlates of institutional and interpersonal discrimination reported by underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese I, and obese II/III Americans. Analyses use data from the Midlife Development in the United States study, a national survey of more than 3,000 adults ages 25 to 74 in 1995. Compared to normal weight persons, obese II/III persons (body mass index of 35 or higher) are more likely to report institutional and day-to-day interpersonal… Expand
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