Is Employer-Based Health Insurance a Barrier to Entrepreneurship?

@article{Fairlie2011IsEH,
  title={Is Employer-Based Health Insurance a Barrier to Entrepreneurship?},
  author={Robert W. Fairlie and Kanika Kapur and Susan M. Gates},
  journal={ERPN: Support Services (Sub-Topic)},
  year={2011}
}
The focus on employer-provided health insurance in the United States may restrict business creation. We address the limited research on the topic of "entrepreneurship lock" by using recent panel data from matched Current Population Surveys. We use difference-in-difference models to estimate the interaction between having a spouse with employer-based health insurance and potential demand for health care. We find evidence of a larger negative effect of health insurance demand on business creation… 
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