Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption

@article{Brough2016IsEU,
  title={Is Eco-Friendly Unmanly? The Green-Feminine Stereotype and Its Effect on Sustainable Consumption},
  author={A. Brough and James E. B. Wilkie and J. Ma and Mathew S. Isaac and David Gal},
  journal={Journal of Consumer Research},
  year={2016},
  volume={43},
  pages={567-582}
}
Why are men less likely than women to embrace environmentally friendly products and behaviors? Whereas prior research attributes this gender gap in sustainable consumption to personality differences between the sexes, we propose that it may also partially stem from a prevalent association between green behavior and femininity, and a corresponding stereotype (held by both men and women) that green consumers are more feminine. Building on prior findings that men tend to be more concerned than… Expand
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