Is Coming Out Always a “Good Thing”? Exploring the Relations of Autonomy Support, Outness, and Wellness for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals

@article{Legate2012IsCO,
  title={Is Coming Out Always a “Good Thing”? Exploring the Relations of Autonomy Support, Outness, and Wellness for Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Individuals},
  author={Nicole Legate and Richard M. Ryan and Netta Weinstein},
  journal={Social Psychological and Personality Science},
  year={2012},
  volume={3},
  pages={145 - 152}
}
Prior research suggests that, on average, disclosing sexual identity (being “out”) yields wellness benefits for lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) individuals. LGB individuals vary, however, both in how much they disclose their sexual orientation in different social contexts and in the experiences that follow from disclosure. The present research examines this within-person variation in disclosure and its consequences as a function of the autonomy supportive versus controlling character of social… 

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