Is Cancer History Associated With Assets, Debt, and Net Worth in the United States?

@article{Doroudi2018IsCH,
  title={Is Cancer History Associated With Assets, Debt, and Net Worth in the United States?},
  author={Maryam Doroudi and Diarmuid Coughlan and Matthew P. Banegas and Xuesong Han and K Robin Yabroff},
  journal={JNCI cancer spectrum},
  year={2018},
  volume={2 2},
  pages={
          pky004
        }
}
Background Financial hardships experienced by cancer survivors have become a prominent public health issue in the United States. Few studies of financial hardship have assessed financial holdings, including assets, debts, and their values, associated with a cancer history. Methods Using the 2008-2011 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, we identified 1603 cancer survivors and 34 915 individuals age 18-64 years without a cancer history to assess associations between self-reported cancer history… 

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