Is Buddhism the low fertility religion of Asia

@article{Skirbekk2015IsBT,
  title={Is Buddhism the low fertility religion of Asia},
  author={V. Skirbekk and M. Stonawski and S. Fukuda and T. Spoorenberg and C. Hackett and R. Muttarak},
  journal={Demographic Research},
  year={2015},
  volume={32},
  pages={1-28}
}
BACKGROUND: The influence of religion on demographic behaviors has been extensively studied mainly for Abrahamic religions. Although Buddhism is the world's fourth largest religion and is dominant in several Asian nations experiencing very low fertility, the impact of Buddism on childbearing has received comparatively little research attention. OBJECTIVE: This paper draws upon a variety of data sources in different countries in Asia in order to test our hypothesis that Buddhism is… Expand

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