Iron acquisition from Fe-pyoverdine by Arabidopsis thaliana.

@article{Vansuyt2007IronAF,
  title={Iron acquisition from Fe-pyoverdine by Arabidopsis thaliana.},
  author={G{\'e}rard Vansuyt and Agn{\`e}s Robin and Jean François Briat and Catherine Curie and Philippe Lemanceau},
  journal={Molecular plant-microbe interactions : MPMI},
  year={2007},
  volume={20 4},
  pages={
          441-7
        }
}
Taking into account the strong iron competition in the rhizosphere and the high affinity of pyoverdines for Fe(III), these molecules are expected to interfere with the iron nutrition of plants, as they do with rhizospheric microbes. The impact of Fe-pyoverdine on iron content of Arabidopsis thaliana was compared with that of Fe-EDTA. Iron chelated to pyoverdine was incorporated in a more efficient way than when chelated to EDTA, leading to increased plant growth of the wild type. A transgenic… 
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