Irish Divorce and Domestic Violence, 1857–1922

@article{Urquhart2013IrishDA,
  title={Irish Divorce and Domestic Violence, 1857–1922},
  author={D. Rennie Urquhart},
  journal={Women's History Review},
  year={2013},
  volume={22},
  pages={820 - 837}
}
  • D. Urquhart
  • Published 1 October 2013
  • Law, History
  • Women's History Review
Ireland was excluded from the Divorce and Matrimonial Causes Act of 1857, which moved divorce proceedings from parliament to court. Whilst other areas of the Empire were encouraged to follow the 1857 reform, Ireland retained the costlier, lengthier and more socially and gender biased parliamentary process. Louisa Westropp's divorce of 1886 was the first divorce granted by Westminster to an Irishwoman and established legal precedent in applying case law, initially concerning domestic violence… 
44 Citations

Marriage in Ireland, 1660–1925

What were the laws on marriage in Ireland, and did the church and state differ in their interpretation? How did men and women meet and arrange to marry? How important was patriarchy and a husband’s

WITCHCRAFT, THE PRESS, AND CRIME IN IRELAND, 1822–1922

Abstract Drawing on witchcraft cases reported in newspapers and coming before Ireland's courts, this article argues that witch belief remained part of Protestant and Catholic popular culture

Selected List of Writings on Irish Economic and Social History Published in 2013

The following is an extensive list of English language publications relating to Irish economic and social history that were published worldwide in 2013. It consists of monographs, articles, essays

Marital Relations

  • Marriage in Ireland, 1660–1925
  • 2020

Introduction

  • Marriage in Ireland, 1660–1925
  • 2020

Desertion

Abductions

Conclusion

  • Marriage in Ireland, 1660–1925
  • 2020

Index

  • Marriage in Ireland, 1660–1925
  • 2020

Meeting and Matching with a Partner

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 69 REFERENCES

Lawmaking in the Shadow of the Empire: Divorce in Colonial Australia

  • H. Finlay
  • History
    Journal of family history
  • 1999
The colonial parliamentary debates during the period from 1858 to 1873 leading to the enactment of laws based on the English Divorce Act are sketched, showing how opposition to divorce gave way in the end to consideration for the plight of deserted wives and children as the chief motivation for reform.

Putting Asunder: A History of Divorce in Western Society

The Roman Catholic background the Protestants and divorce - theory and practice 17th century England - divorce frustrated divorce in America - the 17th and 18th centuries 18th century France -

Feminism, Marriage, and the Law in Victorian England, 1850-1895

Bridging the fields of political theory and history, this comprehensive study of Victorian reforms in marriage law reshapes our understanding of the feminist movement of that period. As Mary Shanley

Cruelty in English Divorce: Some Empirical Findings

Cruelty was a specific ground for divorce in England from 1938 to 1970, and was important to women, who monopolized its use. The judicial construction of cruelty requires actual or apprehended danger

Sexual Cruelty and the Case for Divorce in Victorian America

  • R. Griswold
  • Law
    Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society
  • 1986
In February 1876, Abigail English filed for a legal separation from her husband John on the ground of extreme cruelty. Specifically, the New Jersey resident described the physical suffering she

A Social History of Women in Ireland: 1870-1970

Rosemary Cullen Owens stresses at all times the importance of class and land ownership as key determinants for women's lives. A decrease in home industries allied to increasing mechanisation on the

Marital Violence: An English Family History, 1660-1857

1. Rethinking the histories of violence 2. Resisting violence 3. Children and marital violence 4. Beyond conjugal ties and spaces 5. The origins of professional responses.

Marriage Law and Practice in the Long Eighteenth Century: A Reassessment

Recent years have seen a flourishing of interest in the history of the law of copyright, with important works by Catherine Seville, Ronan Deazley, and Brad Sherman and Lionel Bently, among others.

A Man's Place. Masculinity and the Middle Class Home in Victorian England

John Tosh's book is a signal event. It celebrates the full coming of age of the history of masculinity as a recognised academic sub-discipline. If Davidoff and Hall laid the foundations in this

:A Man's Place: Masculinity and the Middle-Class Home in Victorian England

John Tosh's book is a signal event. It celebrates the full coming of age of the history of masculinity as a recognised academic sub-discipline. If Davidoff and Hall laid the foundations in this
...