Iris Recognition After Death

@article{Trokielewicz2019IrisRA,
  title={Iris Recognition After Death},
  author={Mateusz Trokielewicz and Adam Czajka and Piotr Maciejewicz},
  journal={IEEE Transactions on Information Forensics and Security},
  year={2019},
  volume={14},
  pages={1501-1514}
}
This paper presents a comprehensive study of post-mortem human iris recognition carried out for 1200 near-infrared and 1787 visible-light samples collected from 37 deceased individuals kept in mortuary conditions. We used four independent iris recognition methods (three commercial and one academic) to analyze genuine and impostor comparison scores and check the dynamics of iris quality decay over a period of up to 814 h after death. This study shows that post-mortem iris recognition may be… Expand
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It is found that more than 90% of irises are still correctly recognized when captured a few hours after death, and that serious iris deterioration begins approximately 22 hours later, since the recognition rate drops to a range of 13.3-73.3% when the cornea starts to be cloudy. Expand
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