Iridoid glycosides and host-plant specificity in larvae of the buckeye butterfly,Junonia coenia (Nymphalidae)

@article{Bowers2004IridoidGA,
  title={Iridoid glycosides and host-plant specificity in larvae of the buckeye butterfly,Junonia coenia (Nymphalidae)},
  author={M. Bowers},
  journal={Journal of Chemical Ecology},
  year={2004},
  volume={10},
  pages={1567-1577}
}
  • M. Bowers
  • Published 2004
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Chemical Ecology
Larvae of the buckeye,Junonia coenia (Nymphalidae) feed primarily on plants in four families: Scrophulariaceae, Plantaginaceae, Verbenaceae, and Acanthaceae. These plant families have in common the presence of a group of plant secondary compounds, the iridoid glycosides. Larvae were reared on three plant species and two artificial diets, one with and one without iridoid glycosides.Larvae grew poorly and had low survivorship on the artificial diet without iridoid glycosides, while growth and… Expand
Fate of iridoid glycosides in different life stages of the Buckeye,Junonia coenia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)
TLDR
Feeding experiments suggested that this reduction in actively feeding larvae was due to the metabolism of iridoid glycosides, and calculation of irids consumption and utilization indices showed that larvae fed artificial diets consumed, digested, and sequestered aucubin and catalpol in similar ways. Expand
Fate of Host-Plant Iridoid Glycosides in Lepidopteran Larvae of Nymphalidae and Arcthdae
TLDR
The ability of larvae of six lepidopteran species to sequester iridoid glycosides was compared and it was found that, as expected, J. coenia larvae did contain iridoids, whereas V. cardui larvae did not. Expand
Effect of Iridoid Glycoside Content on Oviposition Host Plant Choice and Parasitism in a Specialist Herbivore
TLDR
Parasitism by the specialist parasitoid wasp Cotesia melitaearum occurred most frequently in larval groups that were feeding on plants with low concentrations of catalpol, irrespective of year, population, and host plant species. Expand
Iridoid glycosides as oviposition stimulants for the buckeye butterfly,Junonia coenia (Nymphalidae)
TLDR
Females ofJunonia coenia (Nymphalidae) were found to use aucubin and catalpol, iridoid glycosides typical of a host plant, Plantago lanceolata, as oviposition cues, and incorporating dried ground leaf material or pure iridoids into agar disks proved to be a very effective method of testing. Expand
Response of generalist and specialist insects to qualitative allelochemical variation
TLDR
Differences between generalists and specialists in their response to qualitative variation in plant allelochemical content are discussed, the induction of feeding preferences, and the evolution of qualitative alleLochemical variation as a plant defense are discussed. Expand
Dietary specialization and the effects of plant species on potential multitrophic interactions of three species of nymphaline caterpillars
TLDR
Results indicate that diet breadth may play an important role in structuring tritrophic interactions, and this role should be further explored. Expand
Development and survival of a specialist herbivore, Melitaea cinxia, on host plants producing high and low concentrations of iridoid glycosides.
TLDR
The spatial and temporal variation of plant species suitability and iridoid glycoside content, and larval family level effects of plant chemistry on performance convey a dynamic ecological and evolutionary relationship between these host plants and their specialized herbivore. Expand
The importance of sequestered iridoid glycosides as a defense against an ant predator
TLDR
Diet and site were consistently significant predictors of the ants' propensities to reject prey and the caterpillars' abilities to escape predation, suggesting that sequestered iridoid glycosides are a defense against predaceous ants. Expand
Effects of Sequestered Iridoid Glycosides on Prey Choice of the Prairie Wolf Spider, Lycosa carolinensis
TLDR
Spiders that bit caterpillars behind their heads or along the middle of their backs prevented Caterpillars from implementing deterrent defensive strategies such as regurgitating or defecating, and found no evidence that the spiders learned to avoid the unpalatable prey. Expand
Euphydryas anicia (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae) utilization of iridoid glycosides fromCastilleja andBesseya (Scrophulariaceae) host plants
TLDR
Iridoid glycosides were found to be sequestered by natural populations of Euphydryas anicia after ingestion from the host plants, and there appeared to be both sex and individual variation in host plant and/or iridoid glucoside utilization by E. anicia. Expand
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