Io after Galileo

@article{Lopes2004IoAG,
  title={Io after Galileo},
  author={Rosaly M. C. Lopes and David A. Williams},
  journal={Reports on Progress in Physics},
  year={2004},
  volume={68},
  pages={303 - 340}
}
Io, the volcanically active innermost large moon of Jupiter, was a target of intense study during the recently completed NASA Galileo mission to Jupiter (1989–2003). Galileo's suite of instruments obtained unprecedented observations of Io, including high spatial resolution imaging in the visible and infrared. This paper reviews the insights gained about Io's surface, atmosphere and space environment during the Galileo mission. Io is thought to have a large Fe–FeS core, whose radius is slightly… 

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Volcanic activity driven by tidal dissipation was initially predicted on Io, Jupiter’s innermost moon, mere months prior to Voyager’s flyby in 1979 [1]. Images from Voyager’s vidicon camera confirmed

Io's dayside SO2 atmosphere

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