Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels blockade in the analgesic effects of orphenadrine

@article{Desaphy2009InvolvementOV,
  title={Involvement of voltage-gated sodium channels blockade in the analgesic effects of orphenadrine},
  author={Jean-François Desaphy and Antonella Dipalma and Michel Bellis and Teresa Costanza and Christelle Gaudioso and Patrick Delmas and Alfred L. George and Diana Conte Camerino},
  journal={PAIN{\textregistered}},
  year={2009},
  volume={142},
  pages={225-235}
}
ABSTRACT Orphenadrine is a drug acting on multiple targets, including muscarinic, histaminic, and NMDA receptors. It is used in the treatment of Parkinson’s disease and in musculoskeletal disorders. It is also used as an analgesic, although its mechanism of action is still unknown. Both physiological and pharmacological results have demonstrated a critical role for voltage‐gated sodium channels in many types of chronic pain syndromes. We tested the hypothesis that orphenadrine may block voltage… 
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