Involvement of the olfactory tubercle in cocaine reward: intracranial self-administration studies.

@article{Ikemoto2003InvolvementOT,
  title={Involvement of the olfactory tubercle in cocaine reward: intracranial self-administration studies.},
  author={Satoshi Ikemoto},
  journal={The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience},
  year={2003},
  volume={23 28},
  pages={9305-11}
}
  • Satoshi Ikemoto
  • Published 2003 in
    The Journal of neuroscience : the official…
Cocaine has multiple actions and multiple sites of action in the brain. Evidence from pharmacological studies indicates that it is the ability of cocaine to block dopamine uptake and elevate extracellular dopamine concentrations, and thus increase dopaminergic receptor activation, that makes cocaine rewarding. Lesion studies have implicated the nucleus accumbens (the dorsal portion of the "ventral striatum") as the probable site of the rewarding action of the drug. However, the drug is only… CONTINUE READING
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Metabolic mapping of the effects of cocaine during the initial phases of self-administration in the nonhuman primate.

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience • 2002
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Rewarding effects of the cholinergic agents carbachol and neostigmine in the posterior ventral tegmental area.

The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience • 2002
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