Involvement of extracellular calcium influx in the self-incompatibility response of Papaver rhoeas.

@article{FranklinTong2002InvolvementOE,
  title={Involvement of extracellular calcium influx in the self-incompatibility response of Papaver rhoeas.},
  author={Vernonica E. Franklin-Tong and Terena L. Holdaway-Clarke and Kornelis Straatman and Joseph G. Kunkel and Peter K Hepler},
  journal={The Plant journal : for cell and molecular biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={29 3},
  pages={
          333-45
        }
}
We have previously demonstrated that increases in cytosolic free Ca2+ are triggered by the self-incompatibility (SI) response in incompatible Papaver rhoeas (the field poppy) pollen. However, one key question that has not been answered is whether extracellular Ca2+ may be involved. To address this question, we have used an ion-selective vibrating probe to measure changes in extracellular Ca2+ fluxes around poppy pollen tubes. Our data reveal several findings. First, we confirm that there is an… Expand
Calcium signalling in pollen of Papaver rhoeas undergoing the self-incompatibility (SI) response
TLDR
Preliminary data is presented showing that influx of extracellular Ca2+ at the ”shank” of the pollen tube is possible, the first evidence suggesting that influx at this localization may play a role in the SI response. Expand
Self-Incompatibility in Papaver rhoeas Activates Nonspecific Cation Conductance Permeable to Ca2+ and K+[W]
TLDR
It is proposed that the SI-stimulated conductance may represent a nonspecific cation channel or possibly two conductances, permeable to monovalent and divalent cations. Expand
Signals and targets of the self-incompatibility response in pollen of Papaver rhoeas.
TLDR
Preliminary evidence that programmed cell death (PCD) may be triggered in this response is described, and a key target for these signals, the actin cytoskeleton, has also been identified. Expand
Cytomechanical properties of papaver pollen tubes are altered after self-incompatibility challenge.
Self-incompatibility (SI) in Papaver rhoeas triggers a ligand-mediated signal transduction cascade, resulting in the inhibition of incompatible pollen tube growth. Using a cytomechanical approach weExpand
The role of Ca2+ and Ca2+ channels in the gametophytic self-incompatibility of Pyrus pyrifolia.
TLDR
It is shown that S-RNase has a distinct effect on the regulation of Ca2+-permeable channel activity in the apical pollen tube in Pyrus pyrifolia and suppressesCa2+ influx prior to arresting pollen tube growth via RNA degradation. Expand
Self-Incompatibility in Papaver Rhoeas: Progress in Understanding Mechanisms Involved in Regulating Self-Incompatibility in Papaver
TLDR
Key findings in recent years are reviewed, including depolymerisation of the actin cytoskeleton and phosphorylation of a soluble inorganic pyrophosphatase, which are involved in the rapid inhibition of pollen tube growth. Expand
Papaver rhoeas S -Determinants and the Signaling Networks They Trigger
TLDR
An overview of the knowledge of the novel cell–cell recognition S-determinants and the signals, targets, and mechanisms triggered by an incompatible interaction is presented. Expand
Investigating pollen signalling networks triggered by the self-incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas
TLDR
Investigation of the role of ROS, NO and H\(^+\) revealed that they all play a role in triggering key features of SI: actin foci formation and caspase-3-like activity, which further the understanding of mechanisms involved in the complex SI signalling network. Expand
The actin cytoskeleton is a target of the self-incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas.
TLDR
The current understanding that the actin cytoskeleton is a target for the signals triggered by the SI response is discussed and the parallels between sustained actin rearrangements during SI and in apoptosis of animal cells are considered. Expand
Identification of hyperpolarization-activated calcium channels in apical pollen tubes of Pyrus pyrifolia.
TLDR
A protocol for successful isolation of spheroplasts from pollen tubes of Pyrus pyrifolia is developed and a hyperpolarization-activated cation channel is identified using the patch-clamp technique and it is proposed that the Ca( 2+)-permeable channel is likely to play a role in mediating Ca(2+) influx into the growing pollen tubes to maintain the [Ca(2+)](cyt) gradient. Expand
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The results provide an important link between a transient rise in Ca2+]i and the biological phenomenon of inhibition of pollen tube growth and demonstrate, for the first time, direct evidence that the SI response in P. rhoeas is mediated by [Ca2+]-i. Expand
Ca2+‐independent phosphorylation of a 68 kDa pollen protein is stimulated by the self‐incompatibility response in Papaver rhoeas
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The identification of an additional pollen protein, p68, which also responds to S proteins by an increase in its phosphorylation state, indicates that the SI signalling pathway in pollen may be quite complex and a ‘second wave’ of Ca2+-independent signalling may follow the initial Ca2-dependent SI signalling. Expand
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Evidence is provided for the involvement of a functional phosphoinositide signal-transducing system in the regulation of pollen tube growth and data is provided suggesting that Ca2+ waves, which have not previously been reported in plant cells, can be induced in pollen tubes. Expand
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