Corpus ID: 18151155

Involvement of dynorphin B in the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid CP55,940 in the spinal cord.

@article{Pugh1997InvolvementOD,
  title={Involvement of dynorphin B in the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoid CP55,940 in the spinal cord.},
  author={George E. Pugh and D J Mason and V{\'e}lv{\'a} M Combs and Sandra P. Welch},
  journal={The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics},
  year={1997},
  volume={281 2},
  pages={
          730-7
        }
}
  • G. Pugh, D. Mason, +1 author S. Welch
  • Published 1997
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
Intrathecal administration of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) but not the cannabinoid agonist CP55,940 enhances the antinociception produced by morphine. In addition, CP55,940- and delta 9-THC-induced antinociception is blocked by the kappa opioid antagonist norbinaltorphimine, and both cannabinoids are cross-tolerant to kappa agonists but do not act directly at the kappa receptor. Previous work in our laboratory has implicated dynorphins in the antinociceptive effects of delta 9-THC… Expand
Dynorphin B and spinal analgesia: induction of antinociception by the cannabinoids CP55,940, Δ9-THC and anandamide 1 Published on the World Wide Web on 18 January 2000. 1
TLDR
Comparing dynorphin B released from perfused rat spinal cord in response to acute administration of anandamide, Delta(9)-THC and CP55,940 at two time points, 10 min and 30 min post administration, confirms that although all three test drugs produced significant antinociception at 10 min, the endocannabinoid, AEA, does not induce antinOCiception via dynorphIn release. Expand
Contribution of spinal μ1-opioid receptors and dynorphin B to the antinociception induced by Tyr-d-Arg-Phe-Sar
TLDR
The results suggest that TAPS mainly stimulates mu(1)-opioid receptors, which subsequently induce the release of dynorphin B, which then acts on kappa-opIOid receptors to produce antinociception. Expand
Cannabinoid modulation of dynorphin A: correlation to cannabinoid-induced antinociception.
TLDR
Data indicate a critical role for dynorphin A release in the initiation of the antinociceptive effects of the cannabinoids at the spinal level and cannabinoid CB1 receptor involvement. Expand
Characterization of anandamide-induced tolerance: comparison to delta 9-THC-induced interactions with dynorphinergic systems.
  • S. Welch
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Drug and alcohol dependence
  • 1997
TLDR
The data indicate that anandamide and delta 9-THC differ in the mechanisms by which they induce tolerance, in particular the interaction with endogenous dynorphinergic systems. Expand
Differential blockade of the antinociceptive effects of centrally administered cannabinoids by SR141716A.
TLDR
Data indicate that SR has a much greater efficacy at supraspinal than at spinal sites and suggest either a differential interaction of the cannabinoids at the CB1 receptor or the existence of subtypes of the cannabinoid (CB1) receptor. Expand
Involvement of the opioid system in the anxiolytic-like effects induced by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol
TLDR
The results demonstrate that the endogenous opioid system is involved in the regulation of anxiety-like behaviour by cannabinoids and provide new findings to clarify further the interaction between these two neuronal systems. Expand
Attenuation of cannabinoid-induced inhibition of medullary dorsal horn neurons by a kappa-opioid receptor antagonist
TLDR
Results indicate that cannabinoid inhibition of nociceptive reflexes produced by WIN-2 and THC may result from inhibition of dorsal horn neurons through a KOR-dependent mechanism. Expand
Synergistic interactions of endogenous opioids and cannabinoid systems
TLDR
It is hypothesize the existence of a new CB receptor differentially linked to endogenous opioid systems based upon data showing the stereoselectivity of endogenous opioid release, and may have significant impact upon the clinical development of cannabinoid/opioid combinations for the treatment of a variety of types of pain in humans. Expand
Dynorphin-independent spinal cannabinoid antinociception
TLDR
The conclusion that antinociception produced by spinal cannabinoids are likely to be mediated directly through activation of cannabinoid receptors without the requirement for dynorphin release or activation of kappa opioid receptors is supported. Expand
Involvement of the κ-opioid receptor in the anxiogenic-like effect of CP 55,940 in male rats
We have studied the possible interaction between three selective opioid-receptor antagonists, nor-binaltorphimine (NB: kappa) (5 mg/kg), cyprodime (CY: mu) (10 mg/kg) and naltrindole (NTI: delta) (1Expand
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TLDR
Observations that dynorphins exert their antagonistic effects on morphine-induced antinociception stereoselectively through spinal kappa opioid receptors may suggest a coupling between spinalKappa and mu opioid receptors. Expand
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  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics
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TLDR
Antinociception produced by delta 9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and delta 8-THC was blocked by the kappa antagonist, nor-BNI and the delta antagonist, N,N-diallyl-Tyr-Aib-Phe-Leu, while low doses of naloxone that appear selective for the mu receptor failed to block the ant inociceptive effect of the cannabinoids. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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  • S. Welch
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • Drug and alcohol dependence
  • 1997
TLDR
The data indicate that anandamide and delta 9-THC differ in the mechanisms by which they induce tolerance, in particular the interaction with endogenous dynorphinergic systems. Expand
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TLDR
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