Involucrin gene of tarsioids and other primates: alternatives in evolution of the segment of repeats.

@article{Djian1991InvolucrinGO,
  title={Involucrin gene of tarsioids and other primates: alternatives in evolution of the segment of repeats.},
  author={Philippe Djian and Howard Green},
  journal={Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
  year={1991},
  volume={88},
  pages={5321 - 5325}
}
  • P. Djian, H. Green
  • Published 15 June 1991
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The involucrin genes of the prosimian primates and of the anthropoid primates possess nonhomologous segments of repeats located at two different sites, P and M, within the coding region. The involucrin gene of the tarsioids alone contains repeats at both sites, for it derived repeats at site P from a common ancestor of tarsioids and prosimians and a repeat at site M from a later common ancestor of tarsioids and anthropoids. After their divergence from the tarsioids, the anthropoids added many… 

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