Invisible Objects: Mortuary Rituals among the Vezo of Western Madagascar

@article{Astuti1994InvisibleOM,
  title={Invisible Objects: Mortuary Rituals among the Vezo of Western Madagascar},
  author={Rita Astuti},
  journal={RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics},
  year={1994},
  volume={25},
  pages={111 - 122}
}
  • Rita Astuti
  • Published 1 March 1994
  • Geography
  • RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics

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