Investment and relatedness: A cost/benefit analysis of breeding and helping in the pied kingfisher (Ceryle rudis)

@article{Reyer1984InvestmentAR,
  title={Investment and relatedness: A cost/benefit analysis of breeding and helping in the pied kingfisher (Ceryle rudis)},
  author={H. -U. Reyer},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1984},
  volume={32},
  pages={1163-1178}
}
  • H. Reyer
  • Published 1 November 1984
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
Breeder-helper-interactions in the pied kingfisher reflect the costs and benefits of cooperative breeding
TLDR
All behavioral interactions and food contributions closely reflect the costs and benefits of giving and receiving help, which vary with the sex of the breeder, the relatedness between the group members, and the period of the reproductive cycle.
A test of the importance of direct and indirect fitness benefits for helping decisions in western bluebirds
TLDR
Western bluebird helpers adjust their feeding rates in response to the potential for direct fitness benefits in the current nest, not indirect benefits or future direct fitness payoffs, which indicates that indirect benefits play a role in how frequently helpers feed at the nest.
No direct fitness benefits of helping in a cooperative breeder despite higher survival of helpers
TLDR
It is suggested that condition rather than benefits accrued as a direct result of helping influenced helper survival, and differences in the timing of breeding between groups showed that helpers bred earliest and nonhelpers with helping opportunities bred latest.
Helping-at-the-nest in Arabian babblers: signalling social status or sensible investment in chicks?
TLDR
The results suggest that provisioning by both helpers and parents in Arabian babblers functions not as a signal, but as sensible investment in chicks, in this species, high relatedness within groups may provide helpers with kin-selected benefits via such investment, although possible advantages from augmentation of group size cannot be ruled out.
Avian Helpers at the Nest: Are they Psychologically Castrated?
TLDR
It is argued that primary helpers in the pied kingfisher, and subordinate helpers in many other cooperative breeders, apparently are not “unwillingly” suppressed in their sexual development; they rather “choose” delayed reproduction when the costs from sexual competition with breeders exceed the benefits from cooperative breeding.
Consequences of 'load-lightening' for future indirect fitness gains by helpers in a cooperatively breeding bird.
TLDR
The finding that males reduce their provisioning rate in the presence of helpers to a greater degree than females, and that this is reflected in an increase in survival rate for males only, implies that the survival increase is caused by the reduction in work-rate rather than a non-specific benefit of a larger group size.
Helpers increase long-term but not short-term productivity in cooperatively breeding long-tailed tits
TLDR
It is concluded that long-tailed tits accrue indirect fitness benefits by helping kin, and the inclusive fitness benefit from helping is substantially lower than that of independent breeding, showing that helpers are making the best of a bad job.
Reproductive skew, costs, and benefits of cooperative breeding in female wood mice (Apodemus sylvaticus)
TLDR
The finding that breeding units of dominant sisters and unrelated females nevertheless occur can be explained by the finding that such females significantly reduce nursing time, which may help them save energy for future breeding cycles.
The effect of kinship on helping in the cooperative breeding Seychelles warbler (Acrocephalus sechellensis)
  • J. Komdeur
  • Environmental Science
    Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences
  • 1994
It has previously been argued that the feeding of nestlings by non-parental birds may simply be an unselected consequence of delayed dispersal in cooperative breeding birds in which individuals
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References

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Avian Communal Breeding Systems
TLDR
Avian communal breeding systems feature precisely that phenomenon that seems most likely to require kin selection as a part of its evolutionary explanation, namely, the presence of a form of operational altruism known as helping behavior.
Communal breeding in green woodhoopoes as a case for reciprocity
TLDR
Information is reported on a tropical, communal bird, the green wood-hoopoe (Phoeniculus purpureus), that suggests helping is a strategy for personal gain, at least in that particular species.
The Evolution of Helping. II. The Role of Behavioral Conflict
  • S. Emlen
  • Psychology
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In part I (Emlen 1982), an ecological constraints model was developed to predict the circumstances under which grown offspring would remain in familial units with their parents. Such retention was
The Prudent Parent: Energetic Adjustments in Avian Breeding 1)
TLDR
Energetics of reproduction in birds is reviewed, and observations of parent starlings confronted with manipulated brood size suggest a limit on the time that can be devoted to energetically extravagant flight activity, rather than a shortage of absolute time.
The Evolution of Alloparental Care and Adoption in Mammals and Birds
  • M. Riedman
  • Biology
    The Quarterly Review of Biology
  • 1982
Alloparental care and adoption of young, aparently altruistic and reproductively costly behaviors, have been reported in over 120 mammalian and 150 avian species. Members of these taxonomically and
The Inheritance of Territory in Group-Breeding Birds
TLDR
It is hypothesized in this paper that, in certain species, remaining home and helping represents a strategy used by nonbreeders to inherit the space necessary for breeding.
Cooperation and Reciprocity in Avian Social Systems
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  • Biology
    The American Naturalist
  • 1983
TLDR
Here I describe a variety of mutually beneficial interactions between birds that typically are not genetically related, and the three major theoretical conditions for the evolution of cooperation appear to agree well with the empirical data described here.
The relationship of habitat quality to group size in Hall's babbler (Pomastostomus halli)
TLDR
Examining some of the proximate factors that influence flock size in a species of bird with a communal social system found three vegetational indices of home range quality that helped to understand the adaptive aspects of operational altruism in such social systems.
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