Investigative studies of the dermatitis caused by the larva of the brown-tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn.)

@article{Jong2004InvestigativeSO,
  title={Investigative studies of the dermatitis caused by the larva of the brown-tail moth (Euproctis chrysorrhoea Linn.)},
  author={C. J. M. de Jong and Philip J. Hoedemaeker and W. L. Jongebloed and J. P. Nater},
  journal={Archives of Dermatological Research},
  year={2004},
  volume={255},
  pages={177-191}
}
SummaryTwo different aspects related to the dermatitis caused by the socalled nettling hairs of the larva of the brown-tail moth,Euproctis chrysorrhoea L., are documented. The first part describes the sequence of histopathologic changes associated with the inflammatory process in the human skin induced by epicutaneous application of untreated (UT-N) and heat treated (HT-N) nettling hairs.The penetration of untreated and heat treated nettling hairs into the epidermis is evident from their… 
Investigative studies of the dermatitis caused by the larva of the brown-tail moth,Euproctis chrysorrhoea L. (lepidoptera, lymantriidae)
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It was shown that NHE is capable of producing the following effects in vitro: 1. consumption of hemolytic complement from human plasma, 2. Generation of plasmin from human Plasminogen, 3. initiation of lysolecithin-mediated histamine release from human leucocytes, and 4. Induction of spherocytosis and lysis of human red blood cells in the presence of exogenous phospholipids.
Investigative studies of the dermatitis caused by the larva of the brown-tail moth,Euproctis chrysorrhoea L. (lepidoptera, lymantriidae)
The tissue irritating nettling hairs ofEuproctis chrysorrhoea caterpillars were subjected to different analytical procedures. It was ascertained that the hairs contain about 2–5% w/w of
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The epidemiology of caterpillar dermatitis naturally shows species differences depending on geographical incidence of the species and the type of foliage on which it feeds.
Venomous caterpillars: From inoculation apparatus to venom composition and envenomation
Caterpillars and moths
  • E. Hossler
  • Biology, Medicine
    Dermatologic therapy
  • 2009
TLDR
Reactions to Lepidoptera can be treated symptomatically with prompt removal of offending hairs, and in the case of potentially fatal Lonomia envenomation, an effective antivenin has been manufactured.
The browntail moth, its caterpillar and their rash
  • S. Alexander
  • Medicine
    Clinical and experimental dermatology
  • 1980
TLDR
For the last 10 years at Barking Hospital and King George's Hospital, Ilford, I have seen three or fovtr cases each year, until this year when there appears to have been a marked increase and I has seen some sixteen patients with this eruption.
A safe and rapid method of collecting the urticating hairs from Euproctis caterpillars (Lepidoptera, Lymantriidae)
TLDR
A method of collecting the urticating hairs of anthropotoxic Euproctis caterpillars using a commercially available filtration unit and a high yield of spicules requisite for analysis of their skin irritating properties is described.
Beware the furry caterpillar
TLDR
For the last 10 years at Barking Hospital and King George's Hospital, Ilford, I have seen three or fovtr cases each year, until this year when there appears to have been a marked increase and I has seen some sixteen patients with this eruption.
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TLDR
It is suggested that the action of the nettling hairs upon the human skin is dependent both on a toxic and mechanical traumatic principle.
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TLDR
It was recognized early that the dermatitis was provoked by the nettling hairs functioning as well as the cocoon, caterpillar or adult moth, which in the cases of severe disease coalesced to form urticarial wheals.
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TLDR
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TLDR
It is well known that certain lepidopterous larvae possess urticating hairs which are the cause of a more or less severe and painful irritation when they come in contact with the human skin, but little definite study has been made of the morphology of the hairs and their underlying structures.
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TLDR
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TLDR
The first phase of the work was to study various caterpillars and their effects on the skin of men, and 5-hydroxytryptamine has been found in the dry venom and sting apparatus of the wasp and also in thedry venom of the scorpion.
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Experiments show that bristle determination occurs between the onset of the moult and the proliferative cell divisions in the epidermis, and a review of the knowledge of differentiative divisions concerned in the formation of organules in other groups of insects is reviewed.
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A group of 36 normal control persons was patch‐tested with glass fibers of the Mime type of fibers from which the epoxy finish had been burned off and a reaction could be noted in 10 out of 29 persons.
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TLDR
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