Investigation of the “Blue Seven Phenomenon” in Elementary and Junior High School Children

@article{Simon1972InvestigationOT,
  title={Investigation of the “Blue Seven Phenomenon” in Elementary and Junior High School Children},
  author={William E. Simon and Louis H. Primavera},
  journal={Psychological Reports},
  year={1972},
  volume={31},
  pages={128 - 130}
}
533 elementary and junior high school children were requested to write down a number between 0 and 9 and the name of a color. The number 7 and the color blue were by far the most frequently written (p < .001 in both cases). These results were consistent with those obtained in an earlier study (Simon, 1971) with college students. 

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