Investigating the functional anatomy of empathy and forgiveness

@article{Farrow2001InvestigatingTF,
  title={Investigating the functional anatomy of empathy and forgiveness},
  author={Tom F. D. Farrow and Y. Zheng and Iain D. Wilkinson and Sean A. Spence and John Francis William Deakin and Nicholas Tarrier and Paul D. Griffiths and Peter W. R. Woodruff},
  journal={Neuroreport},
  year={2001},
  volume={12},
  pages={2433-2438}
}
Previous functional brain imaging studies suggest that the ability to infer the intentions and mental states of others (social cognition) is mediated by medial prefrontal cortex. Little is known about the anatomy of empathy and forgiveness. We used functional MRI to detect brain regions engaged by judging others’ emotional states and the forgivability of their crimes. Ten volunteers read and made judgements based on social scenarios and a high level baseline task (social reasoning). Both… Expand
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