Invertebrate responses to the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant and conventional spring crops. I. Soil-surface-active invertebrates.

@article{Brooks2003InvertebrateRT,
  title={Invertebrate responses to the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant and conventional spring crops. I. Soil-surface-active invertebrates.},
  author={David R. Brooks and David A. Bohan and G. T. Champion and Alison J Haughton and Cathy Hawes and M. S. Heard and Suzanne J. Clark and Alan M. Dewar and Les G. Firbank and J. N. Perry and Peter Rothery and Rod J. Scott and Ian P. Woiwod and Craig Birchall and Matthew P. Skellern and J. H. Walker and Patrick K. Baker and David T. Bell and E. L. Browne and A. J. G. Dewar and C. M. Fairfax and Beulah Garner and L. A. Haylock and Sandra L. Horne and Sarah Hulmes and N. S. Mason and Lisa R. Norton and P. M. Nuttall and Zo{\"e} Randle and M. J. Rossall and Richard J. Sands and Edward J. Singer and M. J. Walker},
  journal={Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences},
  year={2003},
  volume={358 1439},
  pages={
          1847-62
        }
}
  • D. Brooks, D. Bohan, M. J. Walker
  • Published 29 November 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
The effects of herbicide management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) beet, maize and spring oilseed rape on the abundance and diversity of soil-surface-active invertebrates were assessed. Most effects did not differ between years, environmental zones or initial seedbanks or between sugar and fodder beet. This suggests that the results may be treated as generally applicable to agricultural situations throughout the UK for these crops. The direction of the effects was evenly… 

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Invertebrate responses to the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant and conventional spring crops. II. Within-field epigeal and aerial arthropods.

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The effects of management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops on adjacent field margins were assessed, with 24% fewer butterflies in margins of GMHT spring oilseed rape and the likely cause is the lower nectar supply in GMHT tilled margins and crop edges.

Responsiveness of Arthropod Herbivores and Their Natural Enemies to Modified Weed Management in Corn

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Management of genetically modified herbicide–tolerant sugar beet for spring and autumn environmental benefit

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Changes in arthropod fauna from weed management practices in genetically modified herbicide-tolerant maize

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Crop management and agronomic context of the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

  • G. ChampionM. May M. R. Thomas
  • Medicine
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Regression analysis of herbicide-application strategies and weed emergence showed that inputs applied by farmers increased with weed densities in beet and forage maize, and there was no evidence of bias.
...

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Invertebrate responses to the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant and conventional spring crops. II. Within-field epigeal and aerial arthropods.

The effects of the management of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant (GMHT) crops on the abundances of aerial and epigeal arthropods were assessed in 66 beet, 68 maize and 67 spring oilseed rape

Responses of plants and invertebrate trophic groups to contrasting herbicide regimes in the Farm Scale Evaluations of genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops.

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  • Medicine, Biology
    Philosophical transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological sciences
  • 2003
The Farm Scale Evaluations have demonstrated over 3 years and throughout the UK that herbivores, detritivores and many of their predators and parasitoids in arable systems are sensitive to the changes in weed communities that result from the introduction of new herbicide regimes.

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For many species in beet and spring oilseed rape (19 out of 24 cases), seed densities were lower in the seedbank after GMHT cropping, which would result in large decreases in population densities of arable weeds.

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A novel weed–management system for GMHT sugar beet, based on band spraying, which exploits the flexibility offered by the broad–spectrum partner herbicides to demonstrate that creative use of GMHT technology could be a powerful tool for developing more sustainable farming systems in the future.
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