Invasive species in Europe: ecology, status, and policy

@article{Keller2011InvasiveSI,
  title={Invasive species in Europe: ecology, status, and policy},
  author={Reuben P. Keller and Juergen Geist and Johnathan M Jeschke and Ingolf K{\"u}hn},
  journal={Environmental Sciences Europe},
  year={2011},
  volume={23},
  pages={1-17}
}
Globalization of trade and travel has facilitated the spread of non-native species across the earth. A proportion of these species become established and cause serious environmental, economic, and human health impacts. These species are referred to as invasive, and are now recognized as one of the major drivers of biodiversity change across the globe. As a long-time centre for trade, Europe has seen the introduction and subsequent establishment of at least several thousand non-native species… 
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