Invasive species grows faster, competes better, and shows greater evolution toward increased seed size and growth than exotic non-invasive congeners

@article{Graebner2012InvasiveSG,
  title={Invasive species grows faster, competes better, and shows greater evolution toward increased seed size and growth than exotic non-invasive congeners},
  author={Ryan C. Graebner and R. Callaway and D. Montesinos},
  journal={Plant Ecology},
  year={2012},
  volume={213},
  pages={545-553}
}
  • Ryan C. Graebner, R. Callaway, D. Montesinos
  • Published 2012
  • Biology
  • Plant Ecology
  • Comparisons of introduced exotics that invade and those that do not can yield important insights into the ecology of invasions. Centaurea solstitialis, C. calcitrapa, and C. sulphurea are closely related, share a similar life history and were each introduced to western North America from Southern Europe ~100–200 years ago. However, of these three species, only C. solstitialis has become invasive. We collected seeds from different populations for each of the three species both in the native… CONTINUE READING
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