Invasive fungal infections among organ transplant recipients: results of the Transplant-Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET).

@article{Pappas2010InvasiveFI,
  title={Invasive fungal infections among organ transplant recipients: results of the Transplant-Associated Infection Surveillance Network (TRANSNET).},
  author={Peter G. Pappas and Barbara Dudley Alexander and David R. Andes and Susan Hadley and Carol A. Kauffman and Alison G. Freifeld and Elias J. Anaissie and Lisa M. Brumble and Loreen A. Herwaldt and James I. Ito and Dimitrios P. Kontoyiannis and George M. Lyon and Kieren A. Marr and Vicki A. Morrison and Benjamin J Park and Thomas F. Patterson and Trish M. Perl and Robert A. Oster and Mindy G. Schuster and Randall C. Walker and Thomas J. Walsh and Kathleen Wannemuehler and Tom M. Chiller},
  journal={Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America},
  year={2010},
  volume={50 8},
  pages={
          1101-11
        }
}
  • P. PappasB. Alexander T. Chiller
  • Published 15 April 2010
  • Medicine
  • Clinical infectious diseases : an official publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
BACKGROUND Invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among organ transplant recipients. [] Key Method We prospectively identified IFIs among organ transplant recipients from March, 2001 through March, 2006 at these sites. To explore trends, we calculated the 12-month cumulative incidence among 9 sequential cohorts. RESULTS During the surveillance period, 1208 IFIs were identified among 1063 organ transplant recipients.

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