Invasive alien species under attack: natural enemies of Harmonia axyridis in the Netherlands

@article{Berg2014InvasiveAS,
  title={Invasive alien species under attack: natural enemies of Harmonia axyridis in the Netherlands},
  author={C. L. Raak-van den Berg and P. S. Wielink and P. W. Jong and G. Gort and D. Haelewaters and J. Helder and J. C. Lenteren},
  journal={BioControl},
  year={2014},
  volume={59},
  pages={229-240}
}
Abstract The aphid predator Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) is an invasive alien species in Europe and North America with negative effects on non-target species (including a decline of native ladybird populations), as well as fruit production, and human health. It is, therefore, important to find out which natural enemies could be used to reduce their numbers. Knowledge of H. axyridis’ natural enemies is summarised and data collected from the Netherlands over the past ten… Expand

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