Invasive California poppies (Eschscholzia californica Cham.) grow larger than native individuals under reduced competition

@article{Leger2003InvasiveCP,
  title={Invasive California poppies (Eschscholzia californica Cham.) grow larger than native individuals under reduced competition},
  author={Elizabeth A. Leger and Kevin J. Rice},
  journal={Ecology Letters},
  year={2003},
  volume={6},
  pages={257-264}
}
  • E. Leger, K. Rice
  • Published 1 March 2003
  • Environmental Science
  • Ecology Letters
Invasive plants can be larger and more fecund in their invasive range than in their native range, although it is unknown how often this is a result of a genetically controlled shift in traits, a plastic response to a favourable environment, or a combination thereof. Here we present data from common garden experiments that compare the size and fecundity of native and invasive California poppies, Eschscholzia californica Cham. Individuals from 20 populations, half from California (native) and… 

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