Invasion biology, ecology, and management of the light brown apple moth (Tortricidae).

@article{Suckling2010InvasionBE,
  title={Invasion biology, ecology, and management of the light brown apple moth (Tortricidae).},
  author={David Maxwell Suckling and Eckehard G. Brockerhoff},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2010},
  volume={55},
  pages={
          285-306
        }
}
Epiphyas postvittana (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae), the light brown apple moth (LBAM), is an important leafroller pest with an exceptionally wide host range that includes many horticultural crops and other woody and herbaceous plants. LBAM is native to southeastern Australia but has invaded Western Australia, New Zealand, Hawaii, much of England, and in 2007, it was confirmed as established in California. The discovery of this pest in California has led to a major detection and regulatory… 

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