Invading together: the benefits of coalition dispersal in a cooperative bird

@article{Ridley2011InvadingTT,
  title={Invading together: the benefits of coalition dispersal in a cooperative bird},
  author={Amanda R. Ridley},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2011},
  volume={66},
  pages={77-83}
}
  • A. Ridley
  • Published 2011
  • Biology
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Dispersal attempts can be costly and may often end in failure. Individuals should therefore only disperse when the benefits of dispersal outweigh the costs. While previous research has focussed on aspects of the individual that may affect dispersal success, social factors may also influence dispersal outcomes. One way of achieving successful dispersal could be through cooperative, or coalition dispersal. I investigated this possibility in the cooperatively breeding Arabian babbler Turdoides… 

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