Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and Expected Science

@article{Smith2008IntroductionTS,
  title={Introduction to special section on the Phoenix Mission: Landing Site Characterization Experiments, Mission Overviews, and Expected Science},
  author={Peter H. Smith and Leslie K. Tamppari and Raymond E. Arvidson and Deborah S. Bass and Diana L. Blaney and William V. Boynton and Allan I. Carswell and David C. Catling and Benton C. Clark and Thomas J. Duck and E. M. Dejong and David A. Fisher and W. Goetz and P. Gunnlaugsson and Michael H. Hecht and Victoria J. Hipkin and John H. Hoffman and S. F. Hviid and H. Uwe Keller and Samuel P. Kounaves and Carlos F. Lange and Mark T. Lemmon and Morten Bo Madsen and Michael C. Malin and Wojciech J. Markiewicz and John Marshall and Christopher P. McKay and Michael T Mellon and Diane Vera Michelangeli and Doug W. Ming and Richard V. Morris and Nilton De Oliveira Renno and William Thomas Pike and Urs Staufer and Carol R. Stoker and Peter A. Taylor and James Whiteway and Suzanne M. M. Young and Aaron P. Zent},
  journal={Journal of Geophysical Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={113}
}
[1] Phoenix, the first Mars Scout mission, capitalizes on the large NASA investments in the Mars Polar Lander and the Mars Surveyor 2001 missions. On 4 August 2007, Phoenix was launched to Mars from Cape Canaveral, Florida, on a Delta 2 launch vehicle. The heritage derived from the canceled 2001 lander with a science payload inherited from MPL and 2001 instruments gives significant advantages. To manage, build, and test the spacecraft and its instruments, a partnership has been forged between… 

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