Introduction: The Future of Reconstruction Studies

@article{Harlow2017IntroductionTF,
  title={Introduction: The Future of Reconstruction Studies},
  author={Luke E. Harlow},
  journal={The Journal of the Civil War Era},
  year={2017},
  volume={7},
  pages={3 - 6}
}
  • Luke E. Harlow
  • Published 26 January 2017
  • History
  • The Journal of the Civil War Era
2 Citations
Reconstruction Today: A Commentary
William Dunning has a great deal to answer for. He trained generations of historians to view Reconstruction as misguided: vengeful in its policies toward the Southern states and foolhardy in its

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