Intravenously administered bone marrow cells migrate to damaged brain tissue and improve neural function in ischemic rats.

@article{Wu2008IntravenouslyAB,
  title={Intravenously administered bone marrow cells migrate to damaged brain tissue and improve neural function in ischemic rats.},
  author={Jiang Wu and Zhuo Sun and Hong-Shuo Sun and Jun Wu and Richard D. Weisel and Armand Keating and Zhihong Li and Zhong-Ping Feng and R. K.-Y. Li},
  journal={Cell transplantation},
  year={2008},
  volume={16 10},
  pages={993-1005}
}
Accumulated evidence suggests that bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are capable of regenerating damaged tissue. This study evaluated whether intravenously (noninvasively) administered, GFP-labeled BMSCs would migrate into damaged brain tissue and improve neurological function after a stroke. Wistar rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion and reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after injury, the rats received an i.v. injection of culture medium or BMSCs isolated from adult Wistar… CONTINUE READING