Intraspecific variation in group size in the blackbuck antelope: the roles of habitat structure and forage at different spatial scales

@article{Isvaran2007IntraspecificVI,
  title={Intraspecific variation in group size in the blackbuck antelope: the roles of habitat structure and forage at different spatial scales},
  author={Kavita Isvaran},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2007},
  volume={154},
  pages={435-444}
}
  • K. Isvaran
  • Published 5 September 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Oecologia
The main ecological factors that are hypothesized to explain the striking variation in the size of social groups among large herbivores are habitat structure, predation, and forage abundance and distribution; however, their relative roles in wild populations are not well understood. I combined analyses of ecological correlates of spatial variation in group size with analyses of individual behaviour in groups of different sizes to investigate factors maintaining variation in group size in an… Expand
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