Intraspecific variation in Fraxinus pennsylvanica responses to emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)

@article{Koch2015IntraspecificVI,
  title={Intraspecific variation in Fraxinus pennsylvanica responses to emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis)},
  author={Jennifer L. Koch and David W. Carey and Mary E. Mason and Therese M. Poland and Kathleen S. Knight},
  journal={New Forests},
  year={2015},
  volume={46},
  pages={995-1011}
}
The emerald ash borer (EAB; Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire) is a bark and wood boring beetle native to east Asia that was first discovered in North America in 2002. Since then, entire stands of highly susceptible green ash (Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marshall) have been killed within a few years of infestation. We have identified a small number of mature green ash trees which have been attacked by EAB, yet survived the peak EAB infestation that resulted in mortality of the rest of the ash cohort… Expand

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