Intraspecific support for the polygyny‐vs.‐polyandry hypothesis in the bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda

@article{Qian2011IntraspecificSF,
  title={Intraspecific support for the polygyny‐vs.‐polyandry hypothesis in the bulldog ant Myrmecia brevinoda},
  author={Zengqiang Qian and Helge Schl{\"u}ns and Birgit C. Schlick-Steiner and Florian M. Steiner and Simon K. A. Robson and Ellen A. Schl{\"u}ns and Ross H. Crozier},
  journal={Molecular Ecology},
  year={2011},
  volume={20}
}
The number of queens per colony and the number of matings per queen are the most important determinants of the genetic structure of ant colonies, and understanding their interrelationship is essential to the study of social evolution. The polygyny‐vs.‐polyandry hypothesis argues that polygyny and polyandry should be negatively associated because both can result in increased intracolonial genetic variability and have costs. However, evidence for this long‐debated hypothesis has been lacking at… 

Colony genetic structure in the Australian jumper ant Myrmecia pilosula

An isolation-by-distance pattern found suggests the occurrence of dependent colony foundation in M. pilosula; however, independent colony foundation may co-occur since queens of this species have fully developed wings and can fly, and there is no support for the predicted negative association between polygyny and polyandry in ants.

Mating system and population genetic structure of the bulldog ant Myrmecia pavida (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

The population and colony genetic structure of the bulldog ant Myrmecia pavida CLARK, 1951 is examined by genotyping offspring workers from 45 colonies, finding little evidence of geographic structuring or inbreeding in the population, indicating that the species outbreeds.

Multiple Queens versus Multiple Mates: A Test of the Polygyny/Polyandry Tradeoff Hypothesis in the Ant Veromessor pergandei

If the polygyny/polyandry tradeoff hypothesis explains their mating behaviors, it is predicted that solofounding queens should mate with more males than polygynous queens, and polyandry would be higher in temporary groups than in permanent groups.

Mating system and population genetic structure of the bulldog ant Myrmecia pavida

The population and colony genetic structure of the bulldog ant Myrmecia pavida CLARK, 1951 is examined by genotyping offspring workers from 45 colonies, finding little evidence of geographic structuring or inbreeding in the population, indicating that the species outbreeds.

Reproductive conflicts in polyandrous and polygynous ant Formica sanguinea

The results give support to the hypotheses that polyandry and polygyny are alternative breeding strategies and that reproductive competition can lead to different representation of patrilines and matrilines among the sexual and worker broods.

Distribution and origin of intraspecific social variation in the California harvester ant Pogonomyrmex californicus

A correlation between pleometrosis in incipient colonies and polygyny in adult colonies at the population level is demonstrated, and it is strongly suggested that the same occurs in nature.

Decoupled evolution of mating biology and social structure in Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants

It is suggested that multi-queen nesting and mating frequency evolve independently of one another, indicating that behavioral and ecological factors other than genetic diversity contribute to the evolution of complex mating behaviors in leaf-cutting ants.

Breeding systems and genetic diversity in tropical carpenter ant colonies: different strategies for similar outcomes in Brazilian Cerrado savanna

Under low mating frequency, data support that polygyny has evolutionary importance for increasing GD in ant colonies, a mechanism mainly conferred to polyandry.

Social structure of the polygynous ant, Crematogaster osakensis

It is proposed that in C. osakensis, polygynous foundresses might either be unrelated and subsequently be replaced by daughter queens of particular foundresses, or be related in the first place.

Causes and consequences of genetic caste-bias in the eusocial Hymenoptera

Genotypic differences in the physiological response to environmental cues may underlie genetic caste-bias in the social insects, and this work shows that understanding the interaction between physiology, environment and genotype is essential if the authors are to understand the ultimate determinants of individual caste fate.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 88 REFERENCES

GENETIC VARIABILITY, QUEEN NUMBER, AND POLYANDRY IN SOCIAL HYMENOPTERA

It seems that the causal relationship underlying this association is that the number of matings by queens depends on thenumber of queens present in the colony, which supports the GV hypotheses together with the assumption that mating has costs.

Multiple paternity or multiple queens: two routes to greater intracolonial genetic diversity in the eusocial Hymenoptera

It is suggested that fitness benefits resulting from increased intracolonial genetic diversity have played an important role in the evolution of polyandry, and possibly polygyny, in social insects.

Polygyny and polyandry in small ant societies

A new taxon in social Hymenoptera with high queen‐mating frequencies and with intriguing mating and dispersal patterns of the sexuals is found, found in two closely related Neotropical ant species P. inversa and P. villosa.

Mating frequency and mating system of the polygynous ant, Leptothorax acervorum

The mating system of a facultatively polygynous UK population of the ant Leptothorax acervorum is investigated, concluding that the mating system involves queens that mate near nests with unrelated males and then seek readoption by those nests, and queen that mate in mating aggregations away from nests, also with unrelated Males.

Multiple mating and facultative polygyny in the Panamanian leafcutter ant Acromyrmex echinatior

Queen mating frequency of the facultatively polygynous ant Acromyrmex echinatior was investigated by analysing genetic variation at an (AG)n repeat microsatellite locus in workers and sexuals of 20 colonies from a single Panamanian population, finding that 12 out of 13 queens were inseminated by multiple males (polyandry).

Nesting patterns, ecological correlates of polygyny and social organization in the neotropical arboreal ant Odontomachus hastatus (Formicidae, Ponerinae)

Evaluating how nesting ecology and colony structure are associated in this species and investigating how reproduction is shared among nestmate queens suggests that heterogeneous microhabitat conditions probably contribute to the coexistence of variable forms of social structure in O. hastatus.

Ployandry versus polygyny versus parasites

A comparative analysis using phylogenetic information and, contrary to one non–phylogenetic previous study, it is found that polyandry and polygyny are not significantly associated, however, the level of relatedness within colonies is significantly associated with parasite loads.

Nestmate relatedness in the Australian ant myrmecia pyriformis smith, 1858 (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

The results correspond well both to observations on promiscuous mating behaviour in the winged sexuals of some species of Myrmecia and to the occurrence of gamergates (mated workers) in M. pyriformis.

Mating for convenience or genetic diversity? Mating patterns in the polygynous ant Plagiolepis pygmaea

The results show that polyandry occurs frequently in the polygynous ant Plagiolepis pygmaea, however, queens are frequently inseminated by close relatives, and additional sires add little genetic diversity among offspring of individual queens, so the increase in diversity at the colony level is only marginal.

Positive association of queen number and queen-mating frequency Myrmica ants: a challenge to the genetic-variability hypotheses

It is concluded that multiple paternity in M. sulcinodis did not evolve as an adaptation to increase genetic variation within colonies, and that moderate degrees of multiple mating may be an unselected consequence of mating at low cost when mating occurs close to the nest and mating in swarms with a highly male biased operational sex ratio.
...