Intraspecific and interspecific vocal variation in three Neotropical cardinalids (Passeriformes: Fringillidae) and its relationship with body mass

@article{Garca2014IntraspecificAI,
  title={Intraspecific and interspecific vocal variation in three Neotropical cardinalids (Passeriformes: Fringillidae) and its relationship with body mass},
  author={Natalia C. Garc{\'i}a and Ana S. Barreira and Cecilia Kopuchian and Pablo L. Tubaro},
  journal={Emu - Austral Ornithology},
  year={2014},
  volume={114},
  pages={129 - 136}
}
Abstract Several studies, of a large number of bird species, have shown that song frequencies have a strong negative relationship with body size. However, mixed results were obtained at the intraspecific level or when comparing closely related species. Here, we compared the vocalisations of the monotypic Glaucous-blue Grosbeak (Cyanoloxia glaucocaerulea), three of five subspecies of the Ultramarine Grosbeak (Cyanocompsa brissonii) and all four subspecies of the Blue-black Grosbeak (Cyanocompsa… 
Dissecting the roles of body size and beak morphology in song evolution in the “blue” cardinalids (Passeriformes: Cardinalidae)
TLDR
The results show that different morphological variables, even if strongly correlated, can exert differential constraints in a complex behavioral trait such as song.
Vocal variation in relation to genetic structure in an Atlantic forest woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus fuscus): evolutionary and taxonomic implications
TLDR
Vocal variation within the Lesser Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus fuscus), an Atlantic forest suboscine passerine, is analyzed in relation to the genetic lineages previously described, showing that two of the genetic clades within this species have their own vocal type, while the other two lineages share a common type.
Allometric trends reveal distinct evolutionary trajectories for avian communication.
TLDR
Three evolutionary acoustic hypotheses were tested, in which evolution maximizes call ranges by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio; the Stimulus Threshold Hypothesis (STH); and the Body Size Hypotheses (BSH), in which the emission of long wavelengths is enabled by body size.
The acoustic ecology of an Amazonian bird assemblage: the role of allometry, competition and environmental filtering in the acoustic structure
Communication among birds constitutes the foundation of social interactions, and acoustic signals should evolve based on their efficiency to convey information. We examined the acoustic signals of an
Song structure and syllable and song repertoires of the Saffron Finch (Sicalis flaveola pelzelni) breeding in Argentinean pampas
TLDR
This study provides the first detailed analysis of the vocal behaviour of the Saffron Finch, a neotropical songbird found in rural and semi-open areas of Argentina that is frequently captured for the pet trade.
Are aggressive vocalizations the honest signals of body size and quality in female Asian particoloured bats?
TLDR
Female Asian particoloured bats may use aggressive vocalizations to transmit information about their body size and/or body quality (commonly used as a proxy for fighting ability) to their rivals to reduce unnecessary costs during antagonistic interactions.
Visual and Acoustic Communication in Neotropical Birds: Diversity and Evolution of Signals
TLDR
The diversity of visual and vocal signals among Neotropical birds which have been less studied than their counterparts from other biogeographic realms are reviewed to gain a better understanding of avian communication and the factors influencing its evolution.
UNIVERSIDADE FEDERAL DA PARAÍBA CENTRO DE CIÊNCIAS EXATAS E DA NATUREZA PROGRAMA DE PÓS-GRADUAÇÃO EM CIÊNCIAS BIOLÓGICAS (ZOOLOGIA) INGRID
Several species are inserted in the acoustic space due to a long evolutionary process. There is a negative allometric relation between body mass and acoustic frequencies, and this relationship can be
Song as a signal of male identity and quality in the Green-winged Saltator (Saltator similis)
TLDR
The results suggest that the song may act as an honest signal of an individual's body condition in this species, as variables related to frequency modulations were important in both contexts.
Utilizing DeepSqueak for automatic detection and classification of mammalian vocalizations: a case study on primate vocalizations
TLDR
This study shows that DeepSqueak can be successfully utilized to detect, cluster and classify high-frequency/ultrasonic vocalizations of other taxa than rodents, and suggests a validation procedure usable to evaluate further bioacoustics software.
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 60 REFERENCES
Song Frequency Does Not Reflect Differences in Body Size among Males in Two Oscine Species
TLDR
It is found that none of the frequency traits of song that was investigated was related to male body size, nor did more extensive sampling of repertoires lead to any relationship between frequency and body size.
Body size correlates negatively with the frequency of distress calls and songs of Neotropical birds
The allometric relationship between body size and song frequency has been established in previous studies of temperate and tropical bird communities. However, the relationship between body size and
What Makes Vocalisation Frequency an Unreliable Signal of Body Size in Birds? A Study on Black Swans
TLDR
Results show that variation in frequency within individuals and low variation in size across individuals reduce the reliability of vocalisation frequency as a signal of body size, which helps to understand differences among species in the signal value of vocalised frequency.
ECOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AND SPECIES RECOGNITION DRIVES VOCAL EVOLUTION IN NEOTROPICAL SUBOSCINE BIRDS
  • N. Seddon
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2005
TLDR
To my knowledge, these data provide the first direct evidence that species recognition and ecological adaptation operate in tandem, and that the interplay between these factors drives the evolution of mating signals in suboscine birds.
A PERFORMANCE CONSTRAINT ON THE EVOLUTION OF TRILLED VOCALIZATIONS IN A SONGBIRD FAMILY (PASSERIFORMES: EMBERIZIDAE)
  • J. Podos
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 1997
TLDR
A pattern in the evolution of birdsongs that may reflect a constraint on vocal performance is described and the role of constraints associated with vocal tract modulations during song production and evolution is explored.
Indicators of male quality in the hoots of Tawny Owls (Strix aluco)
TLDR
The Tawny Owl (Styix aluco) hoot is important in communication between birds at night when visual information is limited, and is simple enough to allow a quantitative analysis of its structure, but there was no part of the call that correlated with breeding success.
HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF SONG CHARACTERISTICS IN PHYLLOSCOPUS AND HIPPOLAIS WARBLERS
TLDR
Examination of the effects of body mass and habitat structure on variation in song structure of 30 taxa of Phylloscopus and Hippolais warblers found that species occupying closed habitats avoided the use of rapidly modulated signals and had song structures that minimized reverberation.
Associations of Song Properties with Habitats for Territorial Oscine Birds of Eastern North America
  • R. H. Wiley
  • Environmental Science
    The American Naturalist
  • 1991
TLDR
The results suggest that the temporal properties of songs of many oscines have evolved to reduce the effects of reverberation in forested habitats, and Exceptional species might have retained features of song subject to degradation to permit listeners to judge distances to singers.
Body mass and habitat correlates of song structure in a primitive group of birds
TLDR
Positive contrasts of bandwidth were associated with positive contrasts of habitat, confirming that songs of open-habitat species have a wider bandwidth than those of their more closed habitat relatives.
Defining a monophyletic Cardinalini: a molecular perspective.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...